NZ Post Security Centre

We are committed to doing what we can to protect the security of your mail and keep you safe online.

Security in our physical mail network and online is important to New Zealand Post. On this page you'll find information about what NZ Post does to help protect its customers, as well as some tips for protecting yourself online and recognising common scams.

If you think you have been a target of a scam contact Netsafe’s ‘The OrbOpens in a new window. ’ immediately. If you believe the scam involves New Zealand Post in any way please contact us and let us know.

How we help protect you

At New Zealand Post we work with you to keep your mail secure and help you stay safe online. Here are ways we can help:

  • If you are going away for a period of time, think about putting your mail on hold through our Hold service.
  • If you move address, set up a redirection for your mail and let other organisations know your new address immediately. This can be set up by using our Redirections and ChangeMyAddress services.
  • We offer PO Boxes and Private Bags. These are convenient ways to have your mail delivered.
  • Sign up for a RealMe accountOpens in a new window. . This is New Zealand’s secure online identity verification service, officially backed by the NZ Government and created in partnership by the Department of Internal Affairs and NZ Post.
  • The NZ Post website uses encryption technology to keep information sent through our website safe. All stored customer data is protected with passwords, user log-ons and other security procedures.
  • We will never ask for any personal information by email (including usernames, credit card numbers and passwords).

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How you can protect yourself

Valuable and sensitive items are posted through our network every day. Below are tips on how you can keep your items safe and secure.

  • Regularly check your mailbox.
  • Shred any documents that contain personal or sensitive financial information rather than disposing them in the trash or recycling.
  • Change your account passwords frequently.
  • Make sure you use strong passwords containing a mix of letters, numbers and symbols.
  • Never give out your personal information to someone you do not know or trust, online or in person.
  • Treat your personal details like you would treat your wallet and other valuable possessions.
  • Never send personal sensitive information, and credit card numbers via email.
  • Learn about common types of scams and red flags to look out for.

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Identity theft

Identity theft is when someone fraudulently uses someone else's identity. It could be used to access funds in your bank account, obtain a credit card or take out a personal loan in your name.

  • Never give out your personal information to someone you do not know or trust.
  • Treat your personal details like you would treat your wallet and other valuable possessions.
  • Destroy personal information - do not just throw it out. Cut up, burn or shred old bills, account statements or cards so scammers cannot get hold of your personal details.
  • Review bank and credit card statements for any unusual or unauthorised transactions.

Check out the Department of Internal Affair’s Identity Theft ChecklistOpens in a new window. which includes information on what you can do to protect yourself from identity theft.

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Scams

Scams come in many forms. Whether it is a text message, phone call, email or letter, the aim is to gain access to your personal or financial information, or exploit you for financial gain.

Many scams look genuine and sometimes it is hard to tell that they are fake. If you are not sure, do not respond or click on links in messages.

If you think you have been a target of a scam contact Netsafe’s ‘The OrbOpens in a new window. ’ immediately. If you believe the scam involves New Zealand Post in any way please contact us and let us know.

Here is a list of common scams so you can better understand what to look out for. More examples can be found on the Department of Internal Affairs websiteOpens in a new window. .

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Common mail scams

Overseas lottery and other prize scams

You receive a letter in the post from an overseas lottery or sweepstakes company advising that you have won a large sum of money. Typically you will be asked to transfer money to a bank account in order to claim your prize. There are no lotteries that give out winnings to people who do not buy tickets and you should not have to pay a sum of money in order to claim a prize.

Tip: If you do not know about the lottery or you did not purchase a ticket, do not make contact.

Inheritance/Estate Funds scams

You receive a letter in the post from somebody from an estate company. The letter states that you are the beneficiary of a large sum of money from a long lost relative who has passed away. Typically the offer will ask you to send legal fees or some form of tax in advance of receiving your inheritance. Usually they will ask for funds to be sent to them via money transfer agents like Western Union or Money Grams.

Tip: If you have not physically met the person you are sending the money to or the person that has passed away, do not make contact.

Email/Phishing scams

You receive an email from a bank or another trustworthy organisation asking you to update your personal details. The email will appear genuine and will state they require your details for such things as:

  • Upgrading security.
  • Verifying your account.
  • Protecting you from fraud.
  • Offering you a refund.

Typing in your pin and password will give the scammers access to your money and identify.

See an example of a past phishing scam.

Tips

  • Banks will never ask for pin numbers or passwords.
  • Never send personal sensitive information or credit card numbers via email.
  • Never enter your personal details into a website unless you are sure it is genuine.
  • Never click on a link in an email if you are unsure about it.
  • Never visit your bank's website via a link - always type in the address.

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Useful links